until tomorrow


farewelling the day

with a promise to return

from the east quite soon

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Sunset at Ricketts Point on Port Phillip Bay was unpredictable with a touch of brilliance this evening. This sequence of images came over a 15 minute period as I slowly walked along the beach with Charlie. The change in light and atmosphere is at times unusual.





I have seen this cloud

drifting in my past somewhere

we will meet again

Have you ever looked up in the sky and watched a cloud floating along playing the air, forming and evaporating only to be created again in another place. The water cycle is a fascinating natural event and we are all dependant on it for our existence. If only the climate change denying fools in Australia and elsewhere would understand this.

This cloud was snapped from the car on the Campbelltown to Swansea road in midland Tasmania.

Here it is again in


Tarneit near Melbourne Australia, and again


near Bicheno in Tasmania where you could almost land a Jumbo Jet on the beaches, and again

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on the beautiful island of Moorea in French Polynesia, and in


Black Rock a suburb of Melbourne Australia where every evening the sky, sea , sun  and often clouds play with your emotions .

So look up into the sky and find your cloud then look for it when the need comes to you forever after…………….

memories of summer



shadows cross the beach

footprints remember summer

bathing boxes closed


Looking down at Mills Beach near Mornington it is obvious many people enjoy their afternoon stroll walking around to the bluff then back. This beach is a safe protected swimming beach  and a number of lucky families enjoy rights to a bathing box. This term was applied to many hundreds of such small buildings that were located on beaches around Port Phillip Bay since the early 1900’s. Families would spend the day swimming, relaxing  and picnicking using their private box for privacy. During the 1920’s many Sandringham houses were allocated a right on their property title to a bathing box at the local beach . If the house was sold  lucky buyers sometimes found a bathing box was included. Fierce storms in the 1930’s and 1950’s destroyed most Bathing boxes around the bay including all the Sandringham ones. Currently the City of Bayside occasionally builds and sells extra bathing boxes at the iconic Brighton beach location. At auction Brighton boxes have reached around $250,000 on sale.


autumn sunset

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farewelling the sun

another day is ending

are the fish biting

Last evening the many photographers staking out Rickets Point were rewarded with a brilliant red sunset quickly mellowing into softer shades.


a change of mind

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time for a quick stroll

weather turning quickly here

maybe not today

Any sudden squalls or strong wind changes on Port Phillip Bay at high tide means wet challenges for walkers on the Black Rock coastal pathway. Last winter the waves battered the seawall on this coastal strip causing a lot of damage. We have experienced a colder and more recently, a windier Autumn resulting in early pressure on the repairs .


what a challenge


a balancing act

no place to rest or relax

lift off accomplished

Sea birds will perch in all kinds of unusual places however this Pelican really did perform acrobatics to land on this navigation marker  then balance there. Notice the small platform on top  of the small white pole. Perhaps it was just catching a breath or needed to check for any of the flock.


A bird of a life

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floating and gliding

freedom to fly wherever

the same tomorrow


At any time of the day sea birds will be flying from somewhere to somewhere along the Bayside coast. The first photo is of a Pacific Gull. These large gulls are notorious marauders and scavengers. They drift along the cliffs at Black Rock and Sandringham riding the air currents especially on windy and stormy days always looking below for the next feed.

The second photo shares the departure of some Crested Terns as they prepare to move on from Port Phillip Bay. I have not seen any of these strident birds since back earlier in April. They do not migrate long distances however staying around the bay for winter is not on their agenda.