relaxing

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feral stag

interrupted dream

safe for now

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Deer are not native to Australia. Along with many other birds, animals and insects they were introduced by the British invaders mainly for nostalgia, hunting or to eradicate some other introduced species. The first deer were brought from India early in the C19th and released for hunting. Unfortunately they moved quickly into mountainous areas  like the Alps in North East and East Victoria and NSW and at Gariwerd in Western Victoria and bred like rabbits. This is a real Monarch of the Glen scene  ironical that it is in the Grampians,        ( Gariwerd) as named by the early Scottish explorer Mitchell . Deer do quite a deal of damage to the foliage and topsoil in the mountains. However cattle and sheep have destroyed much more of the country since their introduction. Usually deer  are timid and flee as they are not guaranteed longevity in national parks. I was amazed at the apparent tameness of this one only about 10 metres from us on a walking track. It was difficult to see him against the foliage, other people walked past us and did not see the deer. He was in the creek and enjoying a rub down against the tree. I think he is beautiful and do hope he is safe.

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10 thoughts on “relaxing

  1. Lovely words and beautiful photos of a magnificent creature. You are so lucky to have been able to capture these precious moments. We have feral deer in SE QLD too. I have only ever seen one, a stag, and with the biggest antlers I’ve ever seen. He was actually walking through our property and I could not believe my eyes when I glanced out the window and saw him. He probably came out from the state forest at the end of our street looking for water as it was summer at the time and had been extremely dry. Unfortunately I missed the opportunity to get a photo of him, but I will never forget that moment when our eyes met. Just magical!

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    1. Thanks Sue. Our meeting did not seem quite real. Deer are usually so timid, but here in Gariwerd national park they are less wary. I hope this is because they are not being culled. The day before one had run across a road in front of my car and the day before we saw one in a paddock on the outskirts of Halls Gap grazing with kangaroos. They are coming close to settlements for water as there is a serious drought down here, especially in the west of Victoria.

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