fact or fiction

epitaph

warning or welcome

sad farewell

 

from the grave

darkness of despair

deep message

Jill and I were tracking the call of a Tui in The Napier Botanic Gardens in New Zealand when we chanced upon the historical nineteenth century section of the Napier  cemetery .Time stood still for us as we slowly wandered amongst the graves beautifully adorned with semi wild flowers and creepers. Reading the headstones in old graveyards is always fascinating and ones imagination can wander with some of the more detailed ones.  What tragedy lay behind Caroline’s death? was it an accident? Who wrote this first person epitaph? I took the photo and have re visited the image several times to ponder. There is almost a touch of fictional writing within these words of the last line. And we missed the Tui that time.

Just the image for the one a week Photo Challenge word challenge and this week it is FICTION.  This is my contribution . For this years 52 weekly challenges planned by Cathy and Sandra visit Cathy’s blog at  https://nanacathydotcom.wordpress.com/one-a-week-photo-challenge-2017/

The second haiku has been added later  for Ronovan Writes Weekly Haiku Poetry Prompt Challenge 154 Darkness & Deep. To see many other haiku poems using these challenge words hit this link  https://ronovanwrites.com/2017/06/19/ronovanwrites-weekly-haiku-poetry-prompt-challenge-154-darknessdeep/

 

cross story

 prayer wins

amidst destruction

survivor 

On February 3rd 1931 at 10.47 am a violent earthquake struck the east coast Hawkes Bay region on New Zealand’s North Island. There was enormous destruction in the Town of Napier especially throughout the business district. Many buildings were severely damaged or destroyed in the quake however fires that broke out in chemist shops quickly added to the devastation burning through the damaged  structures and scorching any standing  wooden ones.

The trinity Methodist Church pictured here survived the earthquake and fires and was surrounded by desolation. Some say a miracle occurred that day.

The one a week Photo Challenge word challenge this week is CROSS.  This is my contribution . For this years 52 weekly challenges planned by Cathy and Sandra visit Cathy’s blog at  https://nanacathydotcom.wordpress.com/one-a-week-photo-challenge-2017/

 

maggie

 summer born

winner of hearts

sweet maggie

Sunday June 11th was the day Jill and I courageously took up the kind offer of homing Maggie the Afghan pup offered to us by the wonderful Ada and Terry Wilcox. When we first met Maggie in February the litter of 6 were a scrambling, swarming mass of teeth and energy. Even then she had a special personality. On Sunday 2 pups had migrated leaving these 4. As I snapped photos it almost seems Maggie was making the decision to leave the family and venture forth into the wider world at the tender age of 5 and a half months. Watch out for more instalments. AS I post this the little girl is fast asleep beside me on Charlie’s couch

Whale time

whale watching

patience is needed

thar she blows

Jill and I have been away for a few days down the West Coast of Victoria to Warrnambool my old home town of teenage years. The main reason was to catch up with some dear family friends going back to those teenage years and photograph birds. We also hoped to see the first of this season’s Southern Right Whales as they return down the Australian east coast for birthing in what is their traditional nursery in this particular section of the South West Victorian coast. Whales lived in virtual paradise here until the English invasion of 1788. Whale oil was in high demand and within  10 years whalers and sealers hunted along the Victorian coastline slaughtering both species in their thousands. Whaling officially ended in Australia in 1978 with the closure of the last station hunting Sperm and Humpback whales off the South West corner of Western Australia at Albany. To see these beautiful mammals and the care shown by mothers to babies brings thousands of people to Warrnambool from June to November. Whale watching is also popular right down the entire Eastern seaboard.  We were staying just near the Whale watching platform and visited there on our third day. After looking keenly out to sea for 10 minutes along with many other people a voice suddenly called out “there she blows” someone else called there might be a baby. The whale or whales were  some hundreds of metres off the beach and the telephoto lens shots just give  an idea of their presence. We were so lucky.