Rainbows of feathers

proud displays

rainbows of feathers

high and low

Two of our most colourful birds, one obvious and one discreet. The Rainbow Lorikeet here feeding on early Spring blossom is now a common sight in our suburb. The brilliant plumage is clearly evident. The second image is a male Common Bronzewing. These birds are not common in suburban Melbourne. We are fortunate in our city of Bayside to have many golf courses and parks that provide shelter and food for a large variety of indigenous birds. The Friends of Native Wildlife, ( a local government supported environmental group I belong) to have identified a secure fenced area around a golf driving range  that provides  shelter for  a small number of Common Bronzewings. We plant native food ground cover   these birds feed from. We also lead education walks in our parks and were delighted to meet this beautiful male and his mate resting beside a dam in a golf course on a recent bird walk.

what a pair

autumn loss

mutual support

survivors

During our recent holiday in Warrnambool we were driving back from the Warrnambool Breakwater beside a little bay near Middle island, (where Oddball the movie was filmed) when we spotted this pair of Australian Pied Oystercatchers. Not having  photos records  of this bird I stopped the car and quickly made my way down onto the beach and slowly approached the oystercatchers. They were standing close to the water amongst piles of seaweed. When they began to look at me I stopped and set up the monopod with my 500 ml telephoto. Looking through the lens close up at them I had to check and then re check what I was seeing. Both birds had single legs, one was right legged the other had a left leg. Moving a little closer caused them to hop away from me so I began shooting. Neither bird seems distressed and both appeared well fed and in sound condition. What amazing resilience occurs in the natural world, could humans get over such a loss without any assistance?? Also what a co-incidence they should find each other and pair up. Back home at the next Bayside Birds evening I asked the group how common leg loss was with these birds who generally forage on the shoreline and in shallow water. Apparently such accidents are common and are generally caused by pieces of discarded fishing line wrapping around the leg  with disastrous results. Just one more example of humans pursuing their own agenda with little regard for their impact on the natural environment.

These images were waiting for the one a week Photo Challenge challenge and this week it is PAIR.  Here is my contribution . For this years 52 weekly challenges planned by Cathy and Sandra visit Cathy’s blog at  https://nanacathydotcom.wordpress.com/one-a-week-photo-challenge-2017/

 

welcome

autumn guest

an agile feeder

welcome here

This beautiful little Eastern Spinebill has been visiting our garden for the last four Autumns. They are a honeyeater and seek out nectar in blossom. This is a grevillea we bought last Spring in Bendigo hoping it would attract Honeyeaters. For such a small bird they have an incredible loud and sharp whistle like call. Usually we hear them however this year we have seen him/her more often. Today when I came in the front gate I heard, then spotted the bird,feeding on Charlie’s kisses, a fuchsia  growing on Charlie’s resting place. This was an extra special moment.

dinner time

so trusting

young lonely and lost

fledgling bird

A couple of weeks  ago Jill and I were sitting in the garden eating our lunch when this baby Pied Butcherbird flew in and landed on a branch above us. It then flew to the ground and began demanding something to eat. All we could offer  this young carnivore were a few pieces of tinned tuna. That was enough to curb the appetite and it flew back to the branch and had a short sleep. This is the first young one of that species we have seen. When small birds are breeding in Spring adult Butcherbirds raid nests after fledglings. This baby looks cute however it is destined to become a feared marauder in our neighbourhood. The other curious fact about the visit was the time of year. We are almost to Winter and we have had visits from a young Butcherbird, then fledgling Little Wattlebirds and some young looking Magpies during this last month. One more pointer to the effects of Climate Change?

The one a week Photo Challenge word challenge this week is LOST.  This is my contribution . For this years 52 weekly challenges planned by Cathy and Sandra visit Cathy’s blog at  https://nanacathydotcom.wordpress.com/one-a-week-photo-challenge-2017/

life cycle

recycling

from bird to beach

back to dust

Sometimes nature leaves works of art waiting to capture your imagination. As we walked along Norman Beach at Wilson’s promontory National park this collection in the sand made us stop and wonder . At the time we thought there may be a haiku in the scene so I took some photos.

Then I discovered the one a week Photo Challenge word challenge this week is CYCLE . To be different I have used this image with the haiku.  This is my offer. For this years 52 weekly challenges planned by Cathy and Sandra visit Cathy’s blog at  https://nanacathydotcom.wordpress.com/one-a-week-photo-challenge-2017/

curious

grey forest 

quick flash off yellow

autumn bird

Birds in their natural environment are always exciting to watch and listen to.  This Eastern Yellow Robin is a relatively common bird however it is not widespread across Victoria mainly found in forests and scrub down the east coast. We had never seen one so imagine our amazement to be joined on a walk by this curious little Robin  who stayed close to us for a few minutes.. The next day two more made our acquaintance close to the cabin we stayed in.

The one a week Photo Challenge word challenge this week is BIRD . This is my offer. For this years 52 weekly challenges planned by Cathy and Sandra visit Cathy’s blog at  https://nanacathydotcom.wordpress.com/one-a-week-photo-challenge-2017/

The Prom

wombats play

kookaburra laughs

people search

wombats play

kookaburra laughs

people search

We have just returned from a holiday away at Wilson’s Promontory National Park, known affectionally as THE PROM. http://parkweb.vic.gov.au/explore/parks/wilsons-promontory-national-park This is the most Southerly point on the Australian mainland and one of the most visited national parks in the country. It had been nearly 20 years since we last visited here, in those days  carrying everything in packs and hiking on tracks for hours to  camp sites kilometres from cars etc was our forte. This time at that pampered stage of life we stayed in a fully serviced cabin with all luxuries except TV, wifi and that kind of stuff hence no posts, visits comments from me for over a week. Every day we walked, rested, watched wildlife, took photos, remembered, read, knitted and then rested some more. The peace and quiet was a therapy. We both wrote some haiku. The Wombat lived with its baby under our cabin so we were able to watch them closely, as in walk around them if they were on the paths. The Kookaburra was quietly sitting outside our window revving up for a laugh at the Wombats. There were few people around and many of them like us were out using our senses.

 During our stay the weather was often cold, windy and sometimes wet, the sky was usually overcast and sunshine a rare visitor. If you have time to visit this link https://www.google.com.au/search?q=wilsons+promontory&client=firefox-b&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjmrfvf09_TAhUIfLwKHbh7CLgQsAQIfw&biw=1827&bih=1110&dpr=2 there are images of the Prom from across the year . I will post some more haiku/image stories  from our experience.