cross story

 prayer wins

amidst destruction

survivor 

On February 3rd 1931 at 10.47 am a violent earthquake struck the east coast Hawkes Bay region on New Zealand’s North Island. There was enormous destruction in the Town of Napier especially throughout the business district. Many buildings were severely damaged or destroyed in the quake however fires that broke out in chemist shops quickly added to the devastation burning through the damaged  structures and scorching any standing  wooden ones.

The trinity Methodist Church pictured here survived the earthquake and fires and was surrounded by desolation. Some say a miracle occurred that day.

The one a week Photo Challenge word challenge this week is CROSS.  This is my contribution . For this years 52 weekly challenges planned by Cathy and Sandra visit Cathy’s blog at  https://nanacathydotcom.wordpress.com/one-a-week-photo-challenge-2017/

 

Whale time

whale watching

patience is needed

thar she blows

Jill and I have been away for a few days down the West Coast of Victoria to Warrnambool my old home town of teenage years. The main reason was to catch up with some dear family friends going back to those teenage years and photograph birds. We also hoped to see the first of this season’s Southern Right Whales as they return down the Australian east coast for birthing in what is their traditional nursery in this particular section of the South West Victorian coast. Whales lived in virtual paradise here until the English invasion of 1788. Whale oil was in high demand and within  10 years whalers and sealers hunted along the Victorian coastline slaughtering both species in their thousands. Whaling officially ended in Australia in 1978 with the closure of the last station hunting Sperm and Humpback whales off the South West corner of Western Australia at Albany. To see these beautiful mammals and the care shown by mothers to babies brings thousands of people to Warrnambool from June to November. Whale watching is also popular right down the entire Eastern seaboard.  We were staying just near the Whale watching platform and visited there on our third day. After looking keenly out to sea for 10 minutes along with many other people a voice suddenly called out “there she blows” someone else called there might be a baby. The whale or whales were  some hundreds of metres off the beach and the telephoto lens shots just give  an idea of their presence. We were so lucky.

dinner time

so trusting

young lonely and lost

fledgling bird

A couple of weeks  ago Jill and I were sitting in the garden eating our lunch when this baby Pied Butcherbird flew in and landed on a branch above us. It then flew to the ground and began demanding something to eat. All we could offer  this young carnivore were a few pieces of tinned tuna. That was enough to curb the appetite and it flew back to the branch and had a short sleep. This is the first young one of that species we have seen. When small birds are breeding in Spring adult Butcherbirds raid nests after fledglings. This baby looks cute however it is destined to become a feared marauder in our neighbourhood. The other curious fact about the visit was the time of year. We are almost to Winter and we have had visits from a young Butcherbird, then fledgling Little Wattlebirds and some young looking Magpies during this last month. One more pointer to the effects of Climate Change?

The one a week Photo Challenge word challenge this week is LOST.  This is my contribution . For this years 52 weekly challenges planned by Cathy and Sandra visit Cathy’s blog at  https://nanacathydotcom.wordpress.com/one-a-week-photo-challenge-2017/

footprints

come or go

footprints in the sand

lonely fox

As we were walking along the Norman Bay beach near Tidal River in the National park we stopped to observe and photograph some feathers embedded in the sand as shown in “Life Cycle” two posts ago. Through the lens we noticed faint footprints. First I thought dog, but no dogs are allowed in National parks unless they are feral or working and the former are in danger. Then we realised fox and they are even more in danger. I have a soft spot for foxes even though they are significant predators of native fauna. They are smart survivors  and have such  a gift for play but they are wanton killers as well.

Anyway these prints became stronger as we followed them along the beach until they disappeared . Was the fox coming from Tidal River after a scrounge for campers food or was it going down there and returned a different way? We will never know however there is one guarantee, it will be hunted by the rangers. Good luck fox.

life cycle

recycling

from bird to beach

back to dust

Sometimes nature leaves works of art waiting to capture your imagination. As we walked along Norman Beach at Wilson’s promontory National park this collection in the sand made us stop and wonder . At the time we thought there may be a haiku in the scene so I took some photos.

Then I discovered the one a week Photo Challenge word challenge this week is CYCLE . To be different I have used this image with the haiku.  This is my offer. For this years 52 weekly challenges planned by Cathy and Sandra visit Cathy’s blog at  https://nanacathydotcom.wordpress.com/one-a-week-photo-challenge-2017/

curious

grey forest 

quick flash off yellow

autumn bird

Birds in their natural environment are always exciting to watch and listen to.  This Eastern Yellow Robin is a relatively common bird however it is not widespread across Victoria mainly found in forests and scrub down the east coast. We had never seen one so imagine our amazement to be joined on a walk by this curious little Robin  who stayed close to us for a few minutes.. The next day two more made our acquaintance close to the cabin we stayed in.

The one a week Photo Challenge word challenge this week is BIRD . This is my offer. For this years 52 weekly challenges planned by Cathy and Sandra visit Cathy’s blog at  https://nanacathydotcom.wordpress.com/one-a-week-photo-challenge-2017/

The Prom

wombats play

kookaburra laughs

people search

wombats play

kookaburra laughs

people search

We have just returned from a holiday away at Wilson’s Promontory National Park, known affectionally as THE PROM. http://parkweb.vic.gov.au/explore/parks/wilsons-promontory-national-park This is the most Southerly point on the Australian mainland and one of the most visited national parks in the country. It had been nearly 20 years since we last visited here, in those days  carrying everything in packs and hiking on tracks for hours to  camp sites kilometres from cars etc was our forte. This time at that pampered stage of life we stayed in a fully serviced cabin with all luxuries except TV, wifi and that kind of stuff hence no posts, visits comments from me for over a week. Every day we walked, rested, watched wildlife, took photos, remembered, read, knitted and then rested some more. The peace and quiet was a therapy. We both wrote some haiku. The Wombat lived with its baby under our cabin so we were able to watch them closely, as in walk around them if they were on the paths. The Kookaburra was quietly sitting outside our window revving up for a laugh at the Wombats. There were few people around and many of them like us were out using our senses.

 During our stay the weather was often cold, windy and sometimes wet, the sky was usually overcast and sunshine a rare visitor. If you have time to visit this link https://www.google.com.au/search?q=wilsons+promontory&client=firefox-b&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjmrfvf09_TAhUIfLwKHbh7CLgQsAQIfw&biw=1827&bih=1110&dpr=2 there are images of the Prom from across the year . I will post some more haiku/image stories  from our experience.