dinner time

so trusting

young lonely and lost

fledgling bird

A couple of weeks  ago Jill and I were sitting in the garden eating our lunch when this baby Pied Butcherbird flew in and landed on a branch above us. It then flew to the ground and began demanding something to eat. All we could offer  this young carnivore were a few pieces of tinned tuna. That was enough to curb the appetite and it flew back to the branch and had a short sleep. This is the first young one of that species we have seen. When small birds are breeding in Spring adult Butcherbirds raid nests after fledglings. This baby looks cute however it is destined to become a feared marauder in our neighbourhood. The other curious fact about the visit was the time of year. We are almost to Winter and we have had visits from a young Butcherbird, then fledgling Little Wattlebirds and some young looking Magpies during this last month. One more pointer to the effects of Climate Change?

The one a week Photo Challenge word challenge this week is LOST.  This is my contribution . For this years 52 weekly challenges planned by Cathy and Sandra visit Cathy’s blog at  https://nanacathydotcom.wordpress.com/one-a-week-photo-challenge-2017/

cursing cockie

empty plate

such imprecations 

for more cake

The Sulphur crested Cockatoos at Brambuk Indigenous Centre near Halls Gap in Gariwerd (Grampians) National Park insist on sharing food on the outside terrace with visitors. Anyone who ignores their advances is quickly abused and intimidated, the trick is to drip feed them crumbs while you enjoy the food and ambience of the setting. This particular Cockie walked around the table and had to be pushed away while I ate my cake. Upon cleaning up the crumbs he picked up the spoon with his beak and threw it upon the decking screeching something unpleasant in Cockie speak. I thought this was an ideal photo sequence with an added haiku after seeing Ronovan’s Post, Word of the week Imprecation at   https://ronovanwrites.wordpress.com/2017/04/16/word-of-the-week-imprecation/

 

an eye for lunch

birds welcome

sharing the garden

for a meal

We have started planting local and high nectar  native tress and shrubs in our garden with the long term plan being more of the little nectar and seed eating native birds will return or visit. The top image shows a Little Wattlebird discovering a Red Ochre Grevillea, the second is  a Crested Pigeon foraging for grass seeds on the ground and the third captures a Rainbow Lorikeet snacking on a native bird seed stick. There are plenty of introduced species such as Spotted Doves and Common Mynahs who need less encouragement or invasive  native species like Noisy Miners and Little Ravens who force out the original small little birds we want to attract. Our aim is to encourage more of the latter and see or hear less of the former. We want to see small Honeyeaters, Pardalotes, more Thornbills and Eastern Spinebills and one day some Wrens.

The one a week Photo Challenge word challenge this week is LUNCH . This is my offer. For this years 52 weekly challenges planned by Cathy and Sandra visit Cathy’s blog at  https://nanacathydotcom.wordpress.com/one-a-week-photo-challenge-2017/

butterfly blues

seeking food

fooled by a runner

lifes not fair

There is a lot to read into the imagination of this butterfly. Was it attracted by the colour of Jill’s runner? Was it fooled by the pattern that looked like plant structure? Was there some spilt honey on the shoe? Whatever the reason this persistent little insect would not depart. Jill took her shoe off and held it up for me to get a close up shot and still it stayed. Eventually it walked onto her hand and stayed there for a while before finally flying away hopefully discovering real food somewhere.

seed feed

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lorikeets

take easy seed feeds

in the heat

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A small group of 2 adult and three young Rainbow lorikeets drop by our front yard every day recently assuming the seed stick is eternal. They may take anywhere between a week and 2 days to demolish it. If they discover no stick is waiting a dreadful din begins with lots of screeching and screaming with the young ones doing antics on branches  a bit like acrobats on the high wire  until a new stick appears. Then they settle into a quiet chortling amongst themselves even nodding off to sleep at times. Can you spot the 3 young ones in this last image?

This is my contribution to the one a week week Photo Challenge  and the challenge this week is SEED . For this years challenge planned by Cathy and Sandra visit Cathy’s blog at  https://nanacathydotcom.wordpress.com/one-a-week-photo-challenge-2017/

lunch time

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bird traffic 

seeking seed below

time to eat

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Recently we visited the Mornington Peninsula gallery to experience  an incredible  exhibition called ” Birds – Flight Paths in  Australian Art” http://mprg.mornpen.vic.gov.au/Exhibitions/Past-exhibitions/Birds-Flight-paths-in-Australian-Art

The exhibition was spectacular  and also the display from a flock of well over a hundred Little Corellas was entertaining. The flock was ascending, descending , alighting , feeding  all at the same time in and around  and beneath the adjoining Pines and Cypresses that were seeding. Corellas and Cockatoos love the seeds from these trees during Summer. The noise is deafening and brought back memories of my childhood in Western Victoria when similar sized flocks would arrive at our house yard that was surrounded by massive pine trees and Cypresses.

This is my contribution to the one a week week Photo Challenge  and the challenge this week is TRAFFIC . For this years challenge planned by Cathy and Sandra visit Cathy’s blog at  https://nanacathydotcom.wordpress.com/one-a-week-photo-challenge-2017/

crabbing

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longer legs 

keep feathers dry

at feed time

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This pair of Masked Lapwings, (Spur Winged Plovers) were convinced there was some tasty morsel or two waiting for them on the shore at Ricketts Point. Usually they are seen in wetlands or roadsides, anywhere food is offering. They often set up nests in parklands and school grounds and then a problem arises. Both male and female have a spur on one wing and aggressively defend their nest. This can result in wounds to the heads of unwary humans and other animals. Otherwise their haunting cry at night is a sign their is life in the neighbourhood grasslands.