ban the drone

setting sun

needs tranquility

autumn drone

We have been watching and photographing the sunset from Red Bluff  and Ricketts Point for the last week to watch where the sun disappears in relation to the You Yangs. These are the hills on the horizon behind the ship . Jill is curious to see where the sun sets in relation to the You Yangs  when the Autumn Equinox occurs.

Traditionally in pre European times Ricketts Point was a sacred indigenous womens’ site and Red Bluff was sacred to the men.It does not take much imagination to consider possible human physical features in the shape of the You Yangs. Indigenous Australians had strong spiritual connections to the landscape. Most local stories have been lost but there would have been connections to the You Yangs from the women at their site and the men at theirs. Basically the sun sets between the peaks of the You Yangs at or close to the Autumn equinox. We wonder if this was the natural signal for the traditional people to begin planning for movement away from what would be a colder coast as Winter approached and inland to more sheltered areas ?

Of course it takes imagination and dreaming to ponder on these questions. As we marvelled at the setting sun a drone suddenly invaded our space (left of sun and above the bow of the ship) A week ago as the sun was setting before Ricketts Point we counted 5 drones hovering around or moving above the shoreline. Drones have some uses but as toys for idiots in peaceful places of natural beauty they have no place.

settling seagulls

final rays

illuminating

resting gulls

Sunset at Ricketts Point earlier this week seemed to be pacifying the resident seagulls into settling down for the evening. Whatever is in the air has a filtering effect on the last moments of daylight now Autumn is arriving. The evenings have been fairly ordinary  and suddenly since eight days ago spectacular  performances are again put on for waiting photographers.

spiral trio

lighthouse dance

spiral up twist down

shout success

seagull shouts

cloud spirals and twists

twilight act

maori art

twist and spiral form

colour shouts

The first Haibun is the Port fairy Lighthouse, unfortunately locked up to prevent the latest dance craze.

Secondly another beautiful sunset over Port Phillip Bay from Ricketts Point with a lone seagull adding its voice to natures art.

Third is the Maori art work and totem at the entrance to the Polynesian Spa in Rotorua New Zealand. We were a bit disappointed by the commercialisation and overcrowding inside the spa. We were in and out as quickly as if visiting a casino and opted for a wander along the foreshore of Lake Rotorua.

Three contributions to, firstly the one a week Photo Challenge. The challenge this week is SPIRAL . For this years challenge planned by Cathy and Sandra visit Cathy’s blog at  https://nanacathydotcom.wordpress.com/one-a-week-photo-challenge-2017/     and secondly RonovanWrites Weekly Haiku Poetry Prompt Challenge 140 Twist&Shout where this posts joins lots of others at https://ronovanwrites.wordpress.com/2017/03/13/ronovanwrites-weekly-haiku-poetry-prompt-challenge-140-twistshout/

summer evening

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sinking sun

sweaty radiant heat

no relief

A recent sunset over Port Phillip Bay from Ricketts Point after one of our hotter summer days. We haven’t had the heat waves of recent years this summer although predictions are for 3-4 days over 30 oC next week as Autumn kicks in. The sunsets have also not been as consistently spectacular so far this year.

This haiku is my response to RonovanWrites Weekly Haiku Poetry Prompt Challenge 137 Sweat & Heat.  Visit   https://ronovanwrites.wordpress.com/2017/02/20/ronovanwrites-weekly-haiku-poetry-prompt-challenge-137-sweatheat/   to see many other poetic interpretations of these challenge words in haiku.

crabbing

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longer legs 

keep feathers dry

at feed time

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This pair of Masked Lapwings, (Spur Winged Plovers) were convinced there was some tasty morsel or two waiting for them on the shore at Ricketts Point. Usually they are seen in wetlands or roadsides, anywhere food is offering. They often set up nests in parklands and school grounds and then a problem arises. Both male and female have a spur on one wing and aggressively defend their nest. This can result in wounds to the heads of unwary humans and other animals. Otherwise their haunting cry at night is a sign their is life in the neighbourhood grasslands.

farewell again

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suns last flame

a watery kiss

disappears

There is always something about a Summer sunset  across Port Phillip Bay as the last burning rays drop into the water, flicker across the sand and then all is gone for another day.

This is my contribution to RonovanWrites Weekly Haiku Poetry Prompt Challenge 132 Flame & Kiss. To see the heated passion generated by these challenge words in  other haiku poets contributions visit https://ronovanwrites.wordpress.com/2017/01/16/ronovanwrites-weekly-haiku-poetry-prompt-challenge-132-flamekiss/