lunchtime

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cockatoo

expecting some lunch

impatient

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Brambuk is an indigenous cultural centre on the Southern outskirts of Halls Gap. It is the best place to begin an exploration of Gariwerd national park.  Jill was participating in a national textiles forum/workshop and her workplace was at Brambuk. Every morning for a week I would drop her off and plan my morning of hikes, haiku and photography from here. Then late morning I would return for a coffee and cake . By this time the resident wild but very tame Sulphur Crested Cockatoo gang would be waiting for their share of tourist offerings. Tame, as in walking up to the plate you are eating cake from , picking up the fork and throwing it on the ground, hoping to steal some food as one bent down to retrieve the fork. I guess this friendly behaviour was encouraged by the staff who fed them bird pellets and conversed with each one according to their name. To give them credit this table in the second photo was their table and they all waited to be served there.The polite birds each had a chair, the rest lacking manners sat on the table. After their snack they would check out anyone else eating. In an earlier post featuring this species I mentioned the beak is  quite lethal, I have known people to almost lose a finger . Conversely these lovelies would delicately take pellets from cafe staff fingers. I threw my offerings onto a chair. At times there were flocks of these cockatoos  numbering in the dozens flying around Halls Gap. The drought was not impacting on their lifestyle.

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past walks

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gazing down

from lakeview lookout

memories

This scene shows Lake Bellfield at the Northern end of Gariwerd. If you look carefully you will see a small settlement and caravan park on the creek below the wall of the dam.  Three years ago we stayed in a house there and each morning I would walk with Charlie up to the dam and along the top of the wall. This is where Charlie saw her first deer and I was amazed her genetic imprint immediately knew what they were and what she was supposed to do with them. IT took all my strength to restrain her.

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autumn haze 

softens the landscape

lookout views

Swinging around this scene looks down towards Halls Gap, where only a year ago Charlie enjoyed many short walks around the town and became slightly used to seeing Kangaroos up close. Legend has it 2 old blokes walk up from the town to this lookout and back down again every day. I did not see them but quite a few other walkers were struggling on fairly even surfaces.

lost in time

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mountain plan

lifted from the earth

eroding

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This is my contribution to  RonovanWrites Weekly Haiku Poetry Prompt Challenge  88 Lift & Plan. See many more creative interpretations of these challenge words as haiku at https://ronovanwrites.wordpress.com/2016/03/14/ronovanwrites-weekly-haiku-poetry-prompt-challenge-88-liftplan/

Last week I was able to walk  in the these ancient mountains and will post more haiku/images in the next couple of days.

 Gariwerd  to the Djab warring and Jardwadjali people for thousands of years, named The Grampians by a C19th Scottish explorer, now a Victorian national park and again known as  Gariwerd. This mountain range was formed  around 500 million years ago in a tectonic collision and then re shaped in another  about 400 million years later.

See my post from an earlier visit to Gariwerd at https://haikuhound.wordpress.com/2015/07/05/gariwerd/

5 milky smooth haiku

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smooth and still

no milk from this cow 

forever

  1. This cast statue of a cow guards the entrance to the Black Rock veterinary surgery. There is not much call on bovine healing skills in suburban bayside Melbourne

 

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cows grazing

milking has finished

smooth evening

2.  A beautiful Autumn sunset in the far West of Victoria near Yambuk.

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smooth water

strawberry milkshake 

pink sunset

        3. Port Phillip Bay turns on another fascinating sunset for those who    appreciate it.

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smooth singer 

milking the marrow 

from a bone

                       4. A young magpie enjoys what is left of Charlie”s bone

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bright young bird

feathers like milk froth

down so smooth

           5. A fledgling Black Faced Cuckoo Shrike calls for its parents.

This is my contribution to RonovanWrites Weekly Haiku Poetry Prompt Challenge 84 Milk&Smooth. To explore creative haiku from an international array of poets visit https://ronovanwrites.wordpress.com/2016/02/15/ronovanwrites-weekly-haiku-poetry-prompt-challenge-84-milksmooth/

thinking

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clear viewing

vast is the landscape

new haiku

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vast ocean

horizon beckons

clear the mind

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clear new year

vast as the ocean

take some time

This is my contribution to RonovanWrites Weekly Haiku Poetry Prompt Challenge 78 Vast&Clear. Access all the haiku by many creative poets from around the world at https://ronovanwrites.wordpress.com/category/haiku-prompt-challenge/

The images are from the top :

  1. Looking out from Red Rock, an extinct volcano near Colac in the Western Districts of Victoria. From here one can see a number of other extinct volcanos that together make up the largest volcanic plain in the world, (possibly). This region is geologically recent in terms of volcanic activity but on-one talks about this fact. Stimulating incentive to formulating haiku.
  2. That is me standing on the beach north of Bicheno on the central east coast of beautiful Tasmania, the amazing island state of Australia. If you want to clear your mind of dross spend a couple of weeks in Tasmania, better still live there.
  3. Another beautiful sunset from the cliffs at Black Rock two nights ago on 6th January. No better place to think about New Year resolutions, that is think about them!

save a sunrise

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save this memory

for a few moments

the sun will rise again

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One of my rare photo’s of a sunrise. This image was captured at Portland Bay in far South West Victoria Australia. Before 1788 Australian Aboriginals would stand right here in July to October and see hundreds of Southern Right Whales floating, breaching or even scraping off barnacles directly under the cliff.

From the 1790’s Europeans came hunting the whales for oil/blubber and they were slaughtered in their hundreds, probably thousands during the C19th until  a sighting in the C20th was rare. After Australia banned whale hunting in 1968 the whales slowly began returning until now in the early C21st they are always seen, but only in the tens. The numbers of pre 1788 will most likely never be reached again.