what a view

sharp eyesight

seeks pleasure afar

to excite

Maggie and I went walking down along the Black Rock coast path late yesterday afternoon. She had grown up in the bushland hills North of Melbourne  but soon took a liking for the sea. Afghan Hounds are sight hounds and have an amazing ability to spot objects, (often small and furry ) at extreme distances. Her latest tricks down here are climbing up onto rocks along the cliff and looking out to sea  or getting up on the seawall to investigate closer. Her fascination for water is becoming obvious  with her water bowl foot dipping games at home. Is she thinking of seeing how deep the bay in front of her is?  I am glad my Pentax DSLR has anti shake as I was holding Maggie with one hand and manipulating this camera with the other. All the while other walkers and their dogs were passing by. Shadows were deep and the light was failing however we managed to catch a couple of candid shots.

I am finally able to contribute to a double challenge again.

First the image for the one a week Photo Challenge word challenge and this week it is Maggie’s eyesight being extra SHARP.  This is my contribution . For this years 52 weekly challenges planned by Cathy and Sandra visit Cathy’s blog at  https://nanacathydotcom.wordpress.com/one-a-week-photo-challenge-2017/

Secondly this is my contribution to RonovanWrites weekly haiku poetry prompt challenge 164 Pleasure and Excite. To read all the other haiku responses to Ronovan’s challenge visit  https://ronovanwrites.com/2017/08/28/ronovanwrites-weekly-haiku-poetry-prompt-challenge-164-pleasureexcite/

 

 

 

sun still sets

evening nears

solar eye closing

smothered light

I have still been able to occasionally take photos whilst guiding Maggie’s development. She has visited Ricketts Point many times, we were there this evening. Here is a recent sunset, just to remind visitors to Haikuhound that we have such wonderful sunsets across our Port Phillip Bay most evenings . The changes in colour as the clouds swirled across the horizon were amazing.

 

dreaming

winter winds

ancient spirits stir

dream to run

Maggie has been with us for 9 weeks now.

For the last month almost all my active time has been taken up with walking Maggie, watching Maggie, playing with Maggie, training Maggie, cleaning up destruction caused by Maggie, driving Maggie, supervising Maggie’s off lead play with dogs etc . Serious training/socialisation/learning  sessions began for Maggie and me on Sunday. There has been an improvement already and I can return to my Blogging again. Being 10 years older from the time Charlie came  to join our family I/we had forgotten the experiences of homing an Afghan Hound pup. Reality has arrived but it is more exhausting now. Both of us came home and  had a nap after class on Sunday. Here is a 7 month old Maggie in an off lead park between chases and on Sandringham beach watching a ship on the horizon.

what a pair

autumn loss

mutual support

survivors

During our recent holiday in Warrnambool we were driving back from the Warrnambool Breakwater beside a little bay near Middle island, (where Oddball the movie was filmed) when we spotted this pair of Australian Pied Oystercatchers. Not having  photos records  of this bird I stopped the car and quickly made my way down onto the beach and slowly approached the oystercatchers. They were standing close to the water amongst piles of seaweed. When they began to look at me I stopped and set up the monopod with my 500 ml telephoto. Looking through the lens close up at them I had to check and then re check what I was seeing. Both birds had single legs, one was right legged the other had a left leg. Moving a little closer caused them to hop away from me so I began shooting. Neither bird seems distressed and both appeared well fed and in sound condition. What amazing resilience occurs in the natural world, could humans get over such a loss without any assistance?? Also what a co-incidence they should find each other and pair up. Back home at the next Bayside Birds evening I asked the group how common leg loss was with these birds who generally forage on the shoreline and in shallow water. Apparently such accidents are common and are generally caused by pieces of discarded fishing line wrapping around the leg  with disastrous results. Just one more example of humans pursuing their own agenda with little regard for their impact on the natural environment.

These images were waiting for the one a week Photo Challenge challenge and this week it is PAIR.  Here is my contribution . For this years 52 weekly challenges planned by Cathy and Sandra visit Cathy’s blog at  https://nanacathydotcom.wordpress.com/one-a-week-photo-challenge-2017/

 

sea snake

ocean drifter

storm stranded on shore

lonely death

As we followed the fox prints across Norman Beach at Wilson’s Promontory National Park Jill spotted this dead and partly decomposed Yellow Bellied Sea Snake. The fox had clearly decided not to snack on it and soon the body would have been taken out by the tide. WE have never seen one of these snakes. They generally drift on the warmer South Pacific currents and live, feed and die on the water right across the Pacific Ocean. They rarely reach the colder Southern coast of the mainland or Tasmania. There had been some storms in the Tasman Sea in April and probably this poor little snake was churned around and dragged down into colder waters leading to its death.

This is my contribution to RonovanWrites weekly haiku poetry prompt challenge 156 OCEAN & SHORE.  To read all the other haiku responses to Ronovan’s challenge visit https://ronovanwrites.com/2017/07/03/ronovanwrites-weekly-haiku-poetry-prompt-challenge-156-oceanshore/

 

 

dusk glow

stars flame

ember of energy

life support

Another sunset just last week as the sun slipped away for the day leaving this soft and radiant glow across Port Phillip Bay before evening arrived.

Just the setting I thought for RonovanWrites Weekly Haiku Poetry prompt Challenge 155 EMBER & FLAME.

To read other poetic interpretations of this challenge visit https://ronovanwrites.com/2017/06/26/ronovanwrites-weekly-haiku-poetry-prompt-challenge-155-emberflame/

 

what a wave

surfing fun

for a few seconds

wave power

While we were watching the whales in Warrnambool recently these surfers provided entertainment between sightings. When I was a teenager some of my friends would surf at this spot or across the river mouth at Grannies. Both locations have wicked undertow and need to be treated with caution.  This day the waves were small  but holding up well for  any riders who made a catch.

Just the image for the one a week Photo Challenge word challenge and this week it is WAVE.  This is my contribution . For this years 52 weekly challenges planned by Cathy and Sandra visit Cathy’s blog at  https://nanacathydotcom.wordpress.com/one-a-week-photo-challenge-2017/

Whale time

whale watching

patience is needed

thar she blows

Jill and I have been away for a few days down the West Coast of Victoria to Warrnambool my old home town of teenage years. The main reason was to catch up with some dear family friends going back to those teenage years and photograph birds. We also hoped to see the first of this season’s Southern Right Whales as they return down the Australian east coast for birthing in what is their traditional nursery in this particular section of the South West Victorian coast. Whales lived in virtual paradise here until the English invasion of 1788. Whale oil was in high demand and within  10 years whalers and sealers hunted along the Victorian coastline slaughtering both species in their thousands. Whaling officially ended in Australia in 1978 with the closure of the last station hunting Sperm and Humpback whales off the South West corner of Western Australia at Albany. To see these beautiful mammals and the care shown by mothers to babies brings thousands of people to Warrnambool from June to November. Whale watching is also popular right down the entire Eastern seaboard.  We were staying just near the Whale watching platform and visited there on our third day. After looking keenly out to sea for 10 minutes along with many other people a voice suddenly called out “there she blows” someone else called there might be a baby. The whale or whales were  some hundreds of metres off the beach and the telephoto lens shots just give  an idea of their presence. We were so lucky.

footprints

come or go

footprints in the sand

lonely fox

As we were walking along the Norman Bay beach near Tidal River in the National park we stopped to observe and photograph some feathers embedded in the sand as shown in “Life Cycle” two posts ago. Through the lens we noticed faint footprints. First I thought dog, but no dogs are allowed in National parks unless they are feral or working and the former are in danger. Then we realised fox and they are even more in danger. I have a soft spot for foxes even though they are significant predators of native fauna. They are smart survivors  and have such  a gift for play but they are wanton killers as well.

Anyway these prints became stronger as we followed them along the beach until they disappeared . Was the fox coming from Tidal River after a scrounge for campers food or was it going down there and returned a different way? We will never know however there is one guarantee, it will be hunted by the rangers. Good luck fox.

stationary stillness

silence guards

stone river watchers

reflecting

The geography of Wilson’s Promontory National Park is as fascinating as the flora and fauna. Rocks of all shapes and sizes can be found through the Southern and Tidal River sections of the park. Tidal River is where we stayed in the luxury of a cabin where Wombat splayed around outside rather than barging in through the side of a tent. We walked  the boardwalk alongside Tidal River near the mouth and photographed these rocks in morning, afternoon and evening light. Many years ago I would lead groups of my junior school students down here on weekend hikes. One of my former students came back here as a Fine Arts graduate to rearrange groups of rocks he had seen years earlier into conceptual works of landscape art.

The one a week Photo Challenge word challenge this week is STATIONARY.  This is my contribution . For this years 52 weekly challenges planned by Cathy and Sandra visit Cathy’s blog at  https://nanacathydotcom.wordpress.com/one-a-week-photo-challenge-2017/