trees speak out

ancient forest spirits

whisper from distant times

protect our future

These trees are in the Gariwerd National park in Western Victoria in Australia. This is an ancient mountain range formed millions of years ago through geological upheaval. The forests are also ancient and regenerate after regular fires usually caused by lightning but occasionally by humans. For thousands of years, we are not sure how many, but possibly 30-40,000 at least, Indigenous Australians lived within these ranges and respected the flora and fauna. There are many thousands of years old rock art galleries sharing the culture of the Indigenous people throughout Gariwerd. Rock art sites are still occasionally discovered by current scientists that indicates the wild nature of some sections of this area . The haiku in this Haibun is a response to
RonovanWrites #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge #273 Forest&Whisper
go to https://ronovanwrites.com/2019/09/30/ronovanwrites-weekly-haiku-poetry-prompt-challenge-273-forestwhisper/#comments and see lots of other haiku responses to this challenge from Ronovan.

ancestors

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mountain mist

calling for spirits

from the past

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When we recently visited Gariwerd/Grampians National Park most of our planned walking days looked like this. The atmosphere  was so different and the ancient connections of the original Indigenous people became  more of a presence on these days. One  looks for the old people to wander out of the mist and continue along on their pathways as they did right here for thousands and thousands of years until the British arrived in the 1830’s.

Gariwerd

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a tourist playground

dreamtime memories

ancient survivor

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Gariwerd  to the Djab warring and Jardwadjali people for thousands of years, named The Grampians by a C19th Scottish explorer, now a Victorian national park and again known as  Gariwerd. This mountain range was formed  around 500 million years ago in a tectonic collision and then re shaped in another  about 400 million years later. This is a significant spiritual place for Indigenous Australians and a scientific dream for botanists and biologists. A thousand different flowering plants occur here which along with the  range of birds, mammals and insects, the ancient indigenous rock art and the unique natural landscape means thousands of people visit this national park from across Victoria, Australia and the world.

These 3 images are;

1.  Boroka Lookout at the Northern end of the park looking down to Halls Gap. And yes young males do go and sit on the edge sometimes.

2.In the middle of the park looking North to South a year after a devastating bushfire.

3. Gradual regeneration after a severe bushfire.