what a pair

autumn loss

mutual support

survivors

During our recent holiday in Warrnambool we were driving back from the Warrnambool Breakwater beside a little bay near Middle island, (where Oddball the movie was filmed) when we spotted this pair of Australian Pied Oystercatchers. Not having  photos records  of this bird I stopped the car and quickly made my way down onto the beach and slowly approached the oystercatchers. They were standing close to the water amongst piles of seaweed. When they began to look at me I stopped and set up the monopod with my 500 ml telephoto. Looking through the lens close up at them I had to check and then re check what I was seeing. Both birds had single legs, one was right legged the other had a left leg. Moving a little closer caused them to hop away from me so I began shooting. Neither bird seems distressed and both appeared well fed and in sound condition. What amazing resilience occurs in the natural world, could humans get over such a loss without any assistance?? Also what a co-incidence they should find each other and pair up. Back home at the next Bayside Birds evening I asked the group how common leg loss was with these birds who generally forage on the shoreline and in shallow water. Apparently such accidents are common and are generally caused by pieces of discarded fishing line wrapping around the leg  with disastrous results. Just one more example of humans pursuing their own agenda with little regard for their impact on the natural environment.

These images were waiting for the one a week Photo Challenge challenge and this week it is PAIR.  Here is my contribution . For this years 52 weekly challenges planned by Cathy and Sandra visit Cathy’s blog at  https://nanacathydotcom.wordpress.com/one-a-week-photo-challenge-2017/

 

head turning art

 

creative

winter coats for trees

head turning

Recently Jill and I visited Warrnambool and always visit the Botanic gardens. Jill’s   first commission  when she started her Landscape Architecture practice was a master plan for the gardens from Warrnambool Council. There can be rare birds to photograph there and we always check for any design and planting changes. We were surprised to find that these Palm Trees were well rugged up for Winter thanks to  a local creative knitting group practicing  Guerrilla Art.

Just the image for the one a week Photo Challenge word challenge and this week it is TURN.  This is my contribution . For this years 52 weekly challenges planned by Cathy and Sandra visit Cathy’s blog at  https://nanacathydotcom.wordpress.com/one-a-week-photo-challenge-2017/

what a wave

surfing fun

for a few seconds

wave power

While we were watching the whales in Warrnambool recently these surfers provided entertainment between sightings. When I was a teenager some of my friends would surf at this spot or across the river mouth at Grannies. Both locations have wicked undertow and need to be treated with caution.  This day the waves were small  but holding up well for  any riders who made a catch.

Just the image for the one a week Photo Challenge word challenge and this week it is WAVE.  This is my contribution . For this years 52 weekly challenges planned by Cathy and Sandra visit Cathy’s blog at  https://nanacathydotcom.wordpress.com/one-a-week-photo-challenge-2017/

Whale time

whale watching

patience is needed

thar she blows

Jill and I have been away for a few days down the West Coast of Victoria to Warrnambool my old home town of teenage years. The main reason was to catch up with some dear family friends going back to those teenage years and photograph birds. We also hoped to see the first of this season’s Southern Right Whales as they return down the Australian east coast for birthing in what is their traditional nursery in this particular section of the South West Victorian coast. Whales lived in virtual paradise here until the English invasion of 1788. Whale oil was in high demand and within  10 years whalers and sealers hunted along the Victorian coastline slaughtering both species in their thousands. Whaling officially ended in Australia in 1978 with the closure of the last station hunting Sperm and Humpback whales off the South West corner of Western Australia at Albany. To see these beautiful mammals and the care shown by mothers to babies brings thousands of people to Warrnambool from June to November. Whale watching is also popular right down the entire Eastern seaboard.  We were staying just near the Whale watching platform and visited there on our third day. After looking keenly out to sea for 10 minutes along with many other people a voice suddenly called out “there she blows” someone else called there might be a baby. The whale or whales were  some hundreds of metres off the beach and the telephoto lens shots just give  an idea of their presence. We were so lucky.